TCM 25th Anniversary Fan Dedication Contest Winners

Starts Monday, April 15 at 8PM ET | View The Fan Dedication Schedule

To celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Turner Classic Movies, we asked our fans to share their classic movie stories with us by dedicating a favorite TCM classic movie to a special person in their life.

Roger Bow

Movie Selection: The Gold Rush (1925)
Dedication To: His Grandmother
Roger Bow

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I am a lifelong resident of Queens, New York residing in Bayside.
What do you do?
I’m a Radiology Manager for MRI at NYU-Langone Medical Center in New York City.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
My Father was a big Marx Brothers fan. When they re-released Animal Crackers to
What’s a fun fact about you?
I was named after the pre-steroid era MLB Homerun Champion Roger Maris by my Yankee fan Grandfather.
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
My Grandmother Ly Jean Luke introduced me to Charlie Chaplin as a preschooler. I was fascinated by his talent, comedy and situational storytelling in many of his shorts.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
In the early 1970’s a NY station broadcasted Chaplin films during the holidays. My Grandmother was so excited to see The Gold Rush, her favorite Chaplin film, and sat me down to enjoy it with her.
What are some other films you and the person you dedicated this film to love?
Being an immigrant and still learning the English language my Grandmother loved the excellent expressive and physical comedians like Lucille Ball and Red Skelton. She could just sit back and laugh at their sketches all day.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
Many of the first Chinese immigrants that came to the West Coast was during the mid 18th century Gold Rush. The Chinese referred to America as the Gold Mountain. Most were from the poorer villages of southern China like my Grandmothers’ that came to find work and prosperity. This hit home for her since she heard of past relatives that actually did this and had sent money back to China. The shoe eating scene where Chaplin spins his fork around his cooked shoelaces like Lo Mein was an evident hit with Grandmother. She made sure I paid special attention to this poignant hand to mouth survival illustration which she knew all to well from her days living through occupied China during WW2.

Christopher Carhart

Movie Selection: The Shop Around The Corner (1940)
Dedication To: His Partner
Christopher Carhart

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I grew up in Piscataway New Jersey. For the past 33 years I have lived in New York City.
What do you do?
I am a Procurement Supervisor for The Population Council at the Center for Biomedical Research. I work on the campus of Rockefeller University.
How did you discover classic films?
I watched them as a kid but learned about them from my parents. My Mom (Crawford) and Stepdad (Bogart) were big on classic film. Did anyone get you into movies? Movies were the universal language in my family, the common conversation. I just grew up talking about them. Do you remember the first movie you saw? It was “The Doctor’s Wives” a tawdry tale starring the gorgeous Dyan Cannon. I was standing on the back seat of our car at a Drive-in watching it between my parents’ heads. I think I was 5. I remember leopard panties in one scene. I was hooked. The first classic movie you saw? The wondrous “Wizard of Oz”. It was on once a year and I lived for it. “Some Like It Hot” was big in our house too.
What’s a fun fact about you?
I won a Marvel Comic Archie lookalike contest in 1987. I like contests. Also, I have a relative nominated for Sainthood.
To whom are you dedicating your movie?
My Partner Jim Lax. Why? We bonded over classic film on our way to falling in love. On our second date he showed me a photo in his house and asked me to guess who it was. I knew it was Joan Crawford and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. I also knew we were going to click.
When did you discover this movie?
I saw this for the first time on New Year’s Eve about 4 years ago, I usually hate New Year’s, but that night was magic and memorable because the movie was. Have you shared it with anyone else? Several friends, I always recommend it as a thorny rom-com with a big payoff.
What are some other films you and the person you dedicated this film to love?
We LOVE “East Side, West Side” With Barbara Stanwyck and “Ball of Fire” and “Remember the Night”
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
The scene at the end when Alfred reveals himself and her hands are shaking, such good acting! also when Jimmy Alfred sends Vadash flying, and everyone runs over, only to ignore him and pick up all the boxes he knocks over.

Jonathan Chapman

Movie Selection: High Society (1956)
Dedication To: His Wife
Jonathan Chapman

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
Grew up in the southern New Jersey and still live there now in Cherry Hill.
What do you do?
Industrial Cybersecurity Training & Business Coordinator.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
The first classic movie that instantly jumped to mind that remember enjoying as a
What’s a fun fact about you?
As a Jeopardy watcher, I know this question is kind of ‘make or break’ here. I asked my friends for something about me and it was suggested I am a Junk Food Connoisseur. I interested in Holiday themed Cereals, Small Batch Local Artisan Potato Soda, Odd flavored Potato Chips. The sillier the better. I’m nowhere near the level of blogging about it or anything like that but if it says “Limited Edition” on the box, there’s a good I’’ want to buy it. And this means I’ve tasted some pretty bad and some pretty interesting things. I think what most people would find the weirdest thing I’ve done for this cause is I’ve bought vintage Kool-Aid packets well beyond their expiration and drank them. How else would I get to taste discontinued flavors?
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
I’m dedicating High Society to Alex, my wife. The movie just makes me think of her & us for a bunch of reasons. I remember watching it with her originally. It’s our kind of music. It’s our kind of screwball humor. It’s not the best movie ever, but it’s a movie that just stuck with us. It stuck with us so much, we went to the film’s location, Newport RI, for our honeymoon. We even have a goofy studio publicity photo of Bing Crosby & Grace Kelly hanging in our living room as if they were relatives.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
We discovered this movie on TCM watching Maybe 12 years ago having no prior knowledge of it. I remember Regis Philbin was the celebrity guest programmer. Regis was excitedly speaking with Robert Osborne about how High Society should be far better known with its amazing cast, Cole Porter songs, and it being a musical version of the much loved film, the Philadelphia story. He may have even claimed it was better than the Philadelphia story!? (It’s not.) I am known to be a classic movie advocate to my friends and family but I don’t think I have shared this movie with anyone. It’s kind of lived with us as our own goofy thing.
What are some other films you and the person you dedicated this film to love?
42nd Street, All about Eve, The Bishop’s Wife, Footlight Parade, The Happiest Millionaire, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Meet Me in St. Louis, The Muppets, Shaun of the Dead, The Thin Man Series
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
What really does it for me with this movie are the duets with this all-star cast such as Bing Crosby & Frank Sinatra’s first time singing on film together, "Well, Did You Evah!",though borrowed from an earlier Cole Porter Broadway musical DuBarry was a Lady, it suited both performers strength’s perfectly. Another highlight is “Now You Has Jazz”, Bing’s high energy number with Louie Armstrong who plays himself . Frank Sinatra and Celeste Holm have a light & catchy song about not wanting the trappings of being rich,” Who Wants to be a Millionaire.” Even Grace Kelly does a bit of singing with Bing on the romantic ballad “True Love.” That song was nominated for the Academy Award for best song in 1956 but lost to “"Que Sera, Sera" from Hitchcock’s Man Who Knew Too Much.

Ken Cooper

Movie Selection: The Music Man (1962)
Dedication To: His Wife
Ken Cooper

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I was born in 1947 in Grand Rapids, MI and have resided in Manistee County, MI since 1971.
What do you do?
I’m a retired art instructor and still a practicing artist.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
theaters in 1974 after a 25 year legal hiatus my Dad eagerly brought my sister and I to the screening. I have never seen and heard my Dad laugh as hysterically as I had before or after that afternoon. It made me a Die-Hard Marx Bros fan as well.
What’s a fun fact about you?
I was named after the pre-steroid era MLB Homerun Champion Roger Maris by my Yankee fan Grandfather.
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
1. I’m dedicating the movie to my wife of 52 years, Ruth Cooper, because my wife loves this movie and I love her.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
2. I first discovered this movie because of my wife. We’ve shared this movie with anyone who’d listen to us.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
3. I have several favorite scenes from the opening sequence (that Hugh Jackman says is the first Rap Song to be in Musical) to the wonderful library number to when Harold Hill says, “I always think there’s a Band, kid.” And I think you should pay special attention to the fact that as Harold Hill Robert Preston never just walks; he always moves quickly demonstrating a real zest for life.

KADESH DUBOSE

Movie Selection: THE THIN MAN (1934)
Dedication To: His Mom
KADESH DUBOSE

Bio Questions

Where are you from?
I am originally from Chicago. I was born and raised there until I was 12, when I moved out to Washington DC with my family. I live just outside of Washington DC.
What do you do?
I am a photographer and writer.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies?
I discovered classic films through TCM. It was one of the few channels you’d find left on. My mother homeschooled us and was responsible for those TCM being on the TV so often, as she herself grew up with a love of classic films.
Do you remember the first movie you saw?
The Lion King was the first movie I remember seeing.
The first classic movie you saw?
Mutiny on the Bounty is the first classic film I remember watching. It made me sad how mean Charles Laughton was as the Captain.
What’s a fun fact about you?
White Heat is the film that made me want to be a filmmaker. I was so mad at how they dealt with the characters, how the entire movie seemed to be conspiring to kill off Cody. He loved his mother which I connected to. I definitely saw myself pulling for him as the underdog—even though he as the villain. Every time I see White Heat, to this day, I think of ways that I could’ve made the film better.
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
Dedicating this film to my mother. She is the one that directly responsible for my exposure to classic films and I ended up getting my love of films from her.
When did you discover this movie?
I was about 4 years old when I first saw it, but I started clinging to it when I was about 8-9.
Are you a particular fan of…
The Thin Man is my favorite film of all time, and Myrna Loy is my favorite actress of all time.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
Definitely pay attention to Myrna Loy. This is her coming out party basically, and she shows the director and the world that she was the right choice for the role. My favorite scene is the dinner party at the end. It’s the perfect culmination of a fantastic film.

JARED FREDERICK

Movie Selection: GETTYSBURG (1993)
Dedication To: His Mentor
JARED FREDERICK

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
Altoona, Pennsylvania
What do you do?
Instructor of History at Penn State Altoona
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
Like many kids, I was infatuated with The Wizard of Oz when I was very young. However, I grew a deeper appreciation of classic films around age 7 or 8 when I saw the movie The FBI Story on TCM. (I was really into cops and robbers at that time.) I started watching the channel more and have been a loyal fan since. Ever since a young age, I have always had an appreciation of vintage things.
What’s a fun fact about you?
I was and continue to be a big Jimmy Stewart fan. I sent him a homemade birthday card at age 8. That same year, I met actress June Allyson at the Jimmy Stewart Museum in nearby Indiana, Pennsylvania
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
I am dedicating the movie Gettysburg (1993) to my friend and colleague John Heiser. John is one of the head historians at Gettysburg National Military Park and I had the pleasure of working alongside him for five years. Although I have moved on to academia, we remain close friends. He has imparted so much historical knowledge and professional guidance to me over the years. Additionally, he served as an extra (as a Union soldier) in the movie, as it was filmed on and around the actual battlefield.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
Thanks is also due to my Aunt Barb. I watched the movie for the first time at her house alongside my cousins when the film aired as a miniseries on TNT in the summer of 1994. The following summer my family visited the battlefield for the first time. Fourteen years later I worked at the site as a park ranger. While employed at Gettysburg, one of my educational programs pertained to the Civil War in cinema—wherein we analyzed Gettysburg, among many other films. As a history professor I have also used the film in the classroom to examine the Civil War in popular culture.
What are some other films you and the person you dedicated this film to love?
Battleground and 12 O’Clock High (both from 1949
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
I find many scenes compelling but one of the most jaw-dropping is the Pickett’s Charge scene (roughly the 3:30:00 to 3:40:00 mark in the movie). Here are some reasons why: 1) Much of that was filmed on the actual battlefield. 2) The impressive scale and corresponding cinematography. 3) The use of practical effects and no CGI. 4) Randy Edelman’s stirring soundtrack. 5) I gave guided tours on that same landscape twenty years later because this movie sparked my fascination with history.

VANESSA GIORDANO

Movie Selection: A GUY NAMED JOE (1943)
Dedication To: Her Dad
VANESSA GIORDANO

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I’m originally from Mansfield Massachusetts, and have lived in LA for ten years.
What do you do?
I am an actress, writer, and producer.
How did you discover classic films?
When I was in the six grade my stepdad’s mom Peg gave me a bag of VHS tapes. In it, among others, was “An Affair to Remember” and “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?”. Everything changed when I saw “An Affair to Remember”. I kept rewatching it over and over, wanting to be on that cruise ship, in the French Riviera, and at the “top of the Empire State Building”. Deborah Kerr became my hero and my life changed completely at that moment.
Did anyone get you into movies?
Yes. Besides Peg, my Nana, and my Aunt Melissa introduced me to some life changing films. After seeing “An Affair to Remember” and “Whatever Happened to Baby Jane” I knew I wanted to be an actress. When I told my Nana, she asked if I had seen “The Miracle Worker”. When I said I hadn’t, we drove to 4 different Blockbusters that day in search of it because she said I needed to see what great acting was. We watched it together and I will never forget that night. My Aunt Melissa also introduced me to a world of films. We would go to the library together during summer vacations and order movies from different libraries that were hard to find. This was in the 90s, before Amazon and Netflix, so this was so exciting to me to be able to get a hold of these rare movies. We would get a bunch each time, then go home and stay up all night watching a marathon of films, usually with a theme of an actress or director. She also loves Deborah Kerr and I remember one particular night we watched “The Chalk Garden”, “Bonjour Tristesse” and the “Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison”.
Do you remember the first movie you saw?
The Wizard of Oz. When I was 3, someone bought me a special edition VHS. I’m not exaggerating when I say I watched that movie 3-5 times a day for 2 years. I would only wear red glitter shoes and pigtails and begged for a dog. And I would only answer to “Dorothy”. So much so that years later my mom ran into a real estate agent who had sold our condo years prior, and she asked “How is your daughter Dorothy?”
The first classic movie you saw?
The Wizard of Oz
What’s a fun fact about you?
I have three rescue dogs- Ginger, Winston and Carmelo. Ginger, corgi, is so smart! The “North by Northwest” theme is my ringtone, so they are used to hearing it all the time. But one time, “North by Northwest” was on TCM while I was home and Ginger ran to the TV and kept looking back at me like “What is happening, why is that music coming from here?” She totally recognized the score!
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
To my Dad. He has always been there for me in good times and bad and has supported my dreams even when I get discouraged.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
My Dad and I talk every night, usually about a movie we watched, and usually it’s on TCM. We have a habit of comparing originals and remakes, “The Champ” being another of our favorites. A few years ago, he kept mentioning “A Guy Named Joe” and how I had to see it. And how Steven Spielberg remade it as “Always” in a different setting and it was amazing as well. I couldn’t find the DVD anywhere, but then one day, months later, it was on TCM. I watched it, and literally couldn’t breathe at the end I was crying so hard!
Are you a particular fan of…
I love Irene Dunne. Whether it’s mixing screwball comedy and opera in “The Awful Truth” or tearing your heart out in “Penny Serenade”, she is flawless. An actress who can do it all.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
The little kids in the beginning who admire Spencer Tracy are adorable. One of them says “Gosh” and it melts your heart. The chemistry between Spencer Tracy and Irene Dunne is intense, and you really feel they are absolute soulmates. And I love the use of “I’ll Get By” throughout the film. But the scene that really gets me is the ending when Irene Dunne steals that plane and flys that mission, and Spencer Tracy is there with her in the cockpit guiding her and giving her a mouthful about life. She obviously can’t see him, but you know she feels his presence and in a way hears what he is saying to her. And that final line Spencer Tracy delivers, “That’s my girl. And that’s my boy.” It sums up the entire message of the movie which is we are on this Earth for a short time and we might not be in someone’s life forever, but the impact we have on them is what lasts.

GREG JOSEPH

Movie Selection: GIGI (1958)
Dedication To: His Wife, Mary
GREG JOSEPH

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I was born and reared in Kansas City, Missouri. I now live in Sun City Arizona. I lived and worked in Southern California from 1970-90, first in the Los Angeles area, then in San Diego, then moved to Arizona.
What do you do?
I wear two hats – acting and writing. While at the University of Missouri, where I graduated with a degree in drama, I also worked as a cub reporter at The Kansas City Star. A few months after graduation, while I was still working intermittently for The Star, I landed a role in a film shooting half in Missouri and half in Hollywood. The film, “Adam at 6 A.M.,” starred Michael Douglas and was produced by Steve McQueen. The producers and writers were pleased with what I had done and invited me to Hollywood. I accepted and moved into an apartment across from Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, where I resided for several years. When acting got thin, I eventually returned to writing (including Johnny Carson’s “Tonight Show,” which used some of my gags – I didn’t get paid for them, but they used the gags) and, eventually, newspapers. At first I worked for papers in the Los Angeles area, then, after getting married, took a reporting job with The San Diego Tribune (now The San Diego Union Tribune). At “The Tribune,” I moved from hard news to investigative work to features, and finally, in addition to my other duties, I became the paper’s profile writer, mainly of celebrities, a great portion of those in show business. I got to meet and write about actors from Cary Grant and Jimmy Stewart to John Goodman and Jim Carrey, directors from Frank Capra and Billy Wilder to Wes Craven and Spike Lee, to the likes of Haskell Wexler, Fed Silverman, Ted “Dr. Seuss” Geisel, Ray Bradbury, four of Disney’s Nine Old Men, Chuck Jones, Agnes DeMille, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Nora Ephron, Graham Nash, Joan Baez, David Steinberg, Benjamin Spock, Ann Landers et al. At “The Tribune,” I also reviewed many stage productions in San Diego (The Old Globe, La Jolla Playhouse) and Los Angeles (The Shubert Theatre, Ahmanson Theatre, Huntington Hartford), reviewed all books about show business (often including interviews with the subjects or authors), and critiqued film and television, eventually becoming one of the paper’s two TV critics. In 1990, I moved to Arizona, becoming the TV critic of The Arizona Republic. I retired from newspapers in 1994, and about 20 years ago, returned to professional acting, doing film and TV work in Arizona and Los Angeles. I have been a member of SAG-AFTRA for some 50 years, have served in various state and national posts, have served on the NATAS (Emmy) regional board of governors, and was a member of the Arizona Film & Media Coalition Board (designed to bring film and TV production to the state via tax incentives). In 2016 I was nominated for the Arizona Governor’s Arts Award for my contributions to the arts. I also have continued writing – two books, as yet unpublished, a novel and a collection of my celebrity profiles, and scripts.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
When I was a child growing up in Kansas City, my maternal grandmother would take me downtown to see a movie nearly every weekend. Grandma Nelson was a huge movie fan – she knew all about the actors, the backstories to the films, especially if they were show business biographies like “The Will Rogers Story” or “The Eddie Cantor Story” or “Love Me or Leave Me” -- and would make it a full, celebratory day. We would have lunch, go to Woolworth’s to buy a small toy (like a tin soldier or a squirt gun that always leaked), then go to the movie in one of those old-time movie palaces, then ride home, again on the streetcar (which was a thrill in itself). She lived to be almost 100, and to her dying day could remember each of our trips – and the movies. When I started taking the show business trade paper Variety at the ripe age of 12 or 13, while living in Kansas City, Grandma would get to it first!!! **A HUGE thrill for me was getting to profile the actress – Sally Forrest – who starred in the first movie I ever saw – 1950's “Mystery Street – which my grandmother had taken me to see.
What’s a fun fact about you?
I’m Zelig-meets-Forrest Gump, have always just had dumb luck. As an out-of-work actor in Hollywood, poking around for newspaper work to support myself, the first job I was offered was for a little paper whose editor had been the managing editor of The Hollywood Citizen News during the Golden Age of Hollywood. I had the best of both worlds. He introduced me to tons of famous people in “the business,” I got to meet them, picked their minds, and write about them – and I got paid for it. **Best of all, it was through this little newspaper that I met my wife (she was dating one of the other reporters, liked my column, we met – and the rest is history).
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
I’m dedicating this movie to my wife, Mary. Composer Frederick Loewe gave us our first wedding gift – his personal seats to the second night of the stage production of “Gigi” in its pre-Broadway run at The Los Angeles Music Center. The editor at the little Pasadena (Calif.) paper where I was working, the man who had been the managing editor of The Hollywood Citizen News during Hollywood’s salad days and knew everybody, asked me to write a profile of Loewe, spending the day with the composer at the Malibu beach house he was renting for the summer from actor Burt Lancaster. My day included a private concert by the great composer! (His Oscar for “Gigi” rested on the mantel – the only thing on it.) When I went to leave, Loewe asked me, “What does the future hold for you, young man?” In my best Jimmy Stewart drawl, I retorted, “Why, I’m getting married in a few days!” He patted me on the shoulder and flashed a huge grin, and I thought nothing of it. The next day at the newspaper, as I worked on my profile about him, a messenger arrive with an envelope. Inside were two tickets and a handwritten note from Loewe: “Dear Mr. Joseph: Please let this be your very first wedding gift: My personal seats for the second night of ‘Gigi’ at the Music Center. All the best to you and your lovely bride. Sincerely, Fritz Loewe.” In July, my wife and I celebrate out 46th anniversary.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
The cast album from the 1958 Oscar-winning movie was the FIRST record I ever owned – my parents gave it to me with a little record player from graduation from grade school into high school. I listened to it constantly and learned the score nearly by osmosis! Coincidentally, the same cast album was the first CD I ever owned – this was a gift from my children. They had no idea about all the family history involved with the film.
What are some other films you and the person you dedicated this film to love?
We love musicals, old and new, from the Astaire and Kelly films on through “La La Land,” and Hollywood biographies. We are also huge fans of British films.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
My favorite scene in the film is when Gaston (Louis Jordan) realizes and admits to himself that he loves and cannot live without Gigi, and rages musically across Paris, with all the magnificent background scenes that Vincente Minelli -- who himself had scouted -- made full use of. Alan Jay Lerner, in his wonderfully droll 1978 memoir, “On the Street Where I Live,” describes a moment during which he was watching dailies (rushes) of this scene, when at one point, with Gaston sitting on a bench, swans fly across the screen as if on cue. “My God,” Lerner blurted, “how did that happen?” “Shhh,” someone whispered, “Viincente auditioned swans for four days.” Minelli was known for his slow, meticulous shooting, sometimes taking hours just to arrange flowers. I’m also nuts about Chevalier’s “I’m Glad I’m Not Young Any More,” which sprang from a conversation he had with Lerner and Loewe, saying he was content with entertaining at cabarets and was past the time of “wine and women.”

STEVE KALLICK

Movie Selection: SOLDIER IN THE RAIN (1953)
Dedication To: His Dad
STEVE KALLICK

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I was born in Flint, MI but grew up in Overland Park, KS. After college (University of Kansas) I moved out west and now reside in Lafayette, CA, which is 35 miles east of SF.
What do you do?
have been a video editor for over 35 years and also direct. My wife Nina and I own a small ad/marketing agency and post-production facility. We have created commercials, corporate marketing videos and now primarily work on DRTV projects (we sell stuff).
How did you discover classic films?
My parents loved movies and used to take me when I was a little kid. We also watched “old” movies on TV where my mother could name every actor in any film. In her later years, she would end her sentence by adding, ”They’re all dead.” Watching classic movies is something we still share to this day. I remember the smell of the theatre or being happy and safe in the back seat of the car at a drive-in. Now, watching certain classic movies remind me of family members and the time we shared watching them. When I discovered TCM it was a nostalgic smorgasbord!
Did anyone get you into movies?
My mom and dad were avid movie-goers…my early remembrance of movies was going with them. They took me to see Psycho at a drive-in. I was around 5 years old. I remember seeing the car go in to the quicksand… and I hid on the floor of the backseat until I fell asleep. I woke up just in time to see the final scene: pulling the car out of the quicksand. The movie still makes me uncomfortable. Also my father would take me and my friends to a movie on my birthday. On my 7th birthday he took us to see “The Longest Day”, 3 hours later, 2 of my friends were asleep….it truly was the “longest day”.
Do you remember the first movie you saw?
I think I saw the Absent Minded Professor with Fred MacMurray at the theater with my parents. Flubber was cool! I wanted it for my Dad’s car.
The first classic movie you saw?
Probably the Wizard of Oz (every year!) Oh those flying monkeys…
What’s a fun fact about you?
From an early age I new I wanted to be in the industry. After college, I “directed” both Jerry Lewis and Red Skelton in TV commercials (MDA telethon and Red’s clown paintings). I was young, about 23, and did not appreciate being in the presence of comedy royalty. I thought I could give THEM some direction….ha!! On a side note: Mr. Lewis responded to my direction by dropping his pants for the next take….
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
I am dedicating the movie “Soldier in the Rain” to my dad, Otto. He took me to see this movie right after the JFK assassination. I immediately noticed that Jackie Gleason and my father were alike in many ways. The movie was a father / son relationship and I knew that my dad would always be there with humor, discipline, crossword puzzles and to protect me!
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
My dad took me to this movie in ’63. I have recently shared it with my wife and son. I tell them if you want to get an idea of what my dad was like, watch this movie. On a side note, Gleason portrayed my father almost to a “T” in the movie “Nothing in Common” with Tom Hanks….my dad was a traveling salesman and the similarities are uncanny!!
What are some other films you and the person you dedicated this film to love?
The list includes: “The Great Escape” “The Enemy Below” “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance” “The Quiet Man” Magnificent Seven and of course the early James Bond movies.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
The magic Pepsi machine, and the noise it made when Slaughter was alive. At the end of the film, it makes no noise when Eustis finally gets a free soda….Maxwell is truly gone….and of course the fight scene when Slaughter bails out Eustis for the final time….also Slaughter displaying his joy for his new underwear..(I’m beautiful)…Tom Poston soaking in Sauerkraut when Officers arrive for inspection….(Adam West!)

BOB LAPPE

Movie Selection: KING KONG (1933)
Dedication To: his friend and fellow cop
BOB LAPPE

Bio Questions

Where are you from?
Originally from Bronx NY.
Where do you live now?
Nanuet NY
What do you do?
Retired after 30 years in NYPD. Served 8 years in 41st Precinct aka “Fort Apache.” And 22 years in Organized Crime ((20 as commanding officer). Also retired after 18 years from NY Jets of the NFL.
How did you discover classic films?
During the 1950s I’d watch Million Dollar Movie with them. MDM was the original TCM, so to speak. The intro was a picture of a movie clapboard accompanied by Tara’s Theme from Gone with The Wind. The same film would be shown three times a day for seven days.
Did anyone get you into movies?
My parents got me interested in classic movies.
The first classic movie you saw?
The first movie I saw was the 1933 King Kong
What’s a fun fact about you?
1. Perform volunteer work in Bronx nursing home. My mom was a resident there. I do a poor man’s Ben Mankiewicz introducing classic films to residents. I offer pre and post movie commentary and ask the audiences for their remembrances. Sometimes I get in costume if it corresponds to the movie that I’m showing e.g. Zorro, Kong, Dracula, Santa Claus. World on Ice. 2. Have a vintage comic book collection that exceeds 12,000 3. Have an extensive baseball card collection that includes Ruth, Gehrig, Di Maggio and Mantle. 4. Have a BS in English Literature/Creative Writing. Wrote a “Horror” short story and screenplay that won an Academy Award for Best Student Film. My brother made the film while attending New York School For Visual Arts. It was his award.
To whom are you dedicating your movie?
I’m dedicating the movie to Bill Spooner, my bruddah from anudda muddah as we loving refer to each other.
Why?
Kong was the film that brought us together (see video). We share an incredible passion for classic movies. Our favorite genre is (but of course not limited to) classic horror/Sci-fi. Bill possesses extensive knowledge for movie scores and composers. He is primarily responsible for my greater appreciation of movie music. We also attend film conventions together. When trivia contest moderators see us they cringe. We usually walk away with most of the prizes.
When did you discover this movie?
I discovered the movie, King Kong in 1959.
Have you shared it with anyone else?
In the early 1970s I took my younger brother, also named Bill to see the restored version of King Kong. We stayed for 5 showings. He was 10 at the time. He’s gone on to become an accomplished model maker. His Kong’s are awesome!
Are you a particular fan of…
In relation to the movie, King Kong I am a particular fan of the Max Steiner score. This was one of the first times that music was successfully integrated into what was being shown on the screen. I can listen to Steiner’s Kong score and know exactly what scene it’s corresponds to. I’m also a big fan of the animator, Willis O’Brien. He was the first to successfully use stop motion animation in major films (The Lost World 1925). I can only imagine what theater goers must have felt back in 1933 when they saw O’Brien’s work for the first time on the big screen. Probably the same way moviegoers felt when they first saw Spielberg’s Jurassic Park.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific
The Kong vs the T.Rex is my favorite scene. Both combatants demonstrate human qualities (the T Rex rubs his ear hole when Fay Wray first screams) It’s choreographed like a boxing/wrestling match. It incorporates live action, rear projection, and animation. My favorite scene would have been the “Spider Pit” sequence. But, alas, that seems to have been lost forever. But one never knows it may appear someday... hey, who da thought a kid from da Bronx would be a co-host on the most popular movie program in America!

CHRISTOPHER MALCOLM

Movie Selection: THE GRADUATE (1967)
Dedication To: His Mom
CHRISTOPHER MALCOLM

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I have lived in Los Angeles the majority of my life (originally from Nashville by way of Boston but have lived in LA since childhood) and still reside here.
What do you do?
I am a commercial photographer and director working in the activewear and fashion advertising market. Some of my larger clients include Nike, lululemon, and Jordan.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
I fell in love in movies at an early age. At the time, I couldn’t have described for you why it is that I loved to watch those images flicker across the screen at 24 frames per second, but whereas most kids would sit through an Elmo movie 13 times per day, or watch Frozen over and over, or whatever else it is that kids watch these days, in my case, the film that I fell in love with first was John Hughes “Pretty in Pink.” Somehow, at age 7, I already knew I was destined to be more Duckie than Blaine, and there was something about that character that made me force my mother to let me watch it again and again. Even though, as an adult I look back at that movie, which I still watch probably once a year, and it’s pretty clear that there are some issues with the plot. For instance, is Molly Ringwald ending up with Blaine really a happy ending? He clearly doesn’t deserve her. But I digress. That film kicked off my love of film which went into hyperdrive during my final years of high school and solidified during college. “Forrest Gump” was the first movie I went to in the theatre and just said “Wow. This is what film can do.” It was funny, romantic, sad, and dramatic all at the same time. To this day, I can’t think of a better definition of the word “epic.” Billy Wilder once said that he met Sayajit Ray at a movie screening once and they got into a discussion about what makes a perfect film. He said Ray’s description was simple but true. The perfect movie is a film where you walk out of the theatre with a smile on your face and a dried tear on your cheek. Forrest Gump was my first movie going experience that really encapsulated that idea on celluloid for me. Then, the very next year, on my very last night hanging with my father before my first day of college, I went to see “Braveheart.” The year after that, “Jerry Maguire” hit the theatres. And whether it was Forrest Gump running across the wading pool to meet Jenny, Dorothy Boyd running out to Jerry Maguire to the sound of Bruce Springsteen’s “Secret Garden,” or William Wallace basically killing every member of the British military as payback for his fallen wife, I began to understand the power of film to translate love from the screen to the audience. To take all of us sitting out there in the dark into completely different worlds, both physically and emotionally. I set about trying to deliver that power myself, so I wrote my first screenplay and in my early twenties launched my first production company to start making independent films. Of course, me being me, I don’t do anything halfway. So, knowing that I wanted to make great films, I set out to study the work of great filmmakers. And knowing that film wasn’t a medium that was invented only during my lifetime, I started back at the early days of black and white. And, low and behold, there was this channel, Turner Classic Movies, that was there to provide me an essential thesis course in film history. All the great names I’d heard about from Cary Grant to Audrey Hepburn, Gable, Cooper, Stanwyck, the other Hepburn. Suddenly I could watch their movies in full and understand what it was that made them so special. I could study the work of Billy Wilder, William Wyler, and Anthony Mann and learn more about directing than I would learn in any textbook. Oddly enough, what began as an adventure in self education, suddenly became a passion. I started watching classic films because I wanted to learn. But very quickly I came to prefer them to their contemporaries. Whereas nowadays most films are simply a rehashing of old stories, classic cinema gives you an opportunity to see those original screenplays at their inception. As much as I love Bradley Cooper’s “A Star Is Born,” my favorite movie of 2018, I love it even more having seen “What Price, Hollywood?” the original iteration of that plotline. Roger Deakins is an unrivaled genius in the history of cinematography with films like “Sicario” or “The Man Who Wasn’t There.” But I enjoy his work even more having seen the work of early cinematographers like John Alton who not only defined the film noir genre, but whose work continues to influence cinematographers of today. Like, for example, Mr. Deakins Academy Award winning work on Blade Runner 2049. Understanding your history just makes appreciating the present that much more enjoyable. I thank TCM for giving me the ability to educate myself and discover a passion for film that has truly become the love of my life.
What’s a fun fact about you?
I can be verbose as evidenced by my previous answer. But all kidding aside, I am a man of many stories. Life has been a wonderful and wild ride and so there are a million and one different ways I can answer that question. The fact that I refer to Audrey Hepburn as “my wife.” The fact that I keep a master list of every movie I have ever seen, listed by year, and now just shy of 7000 titles. But given my current audience may be in the best position to appreciate it, I think one fun fact worth pointing out is that I once met Robert Osborne. Well, almost met him. During a stint in one of my many, many, day-jobs on my way to building a career as an artist, I used to drive limousines. One night, I was tasked with picking up multiple members of the Fonda family to take them to an event in Beverly Hills where the post office would be dedicating a new stamp in honor of Henry Fonda. Now, I grew up in Los Angeles among celebrities. Specifically, I went to THE prep school where the rich and powerful all sent their kids. So, virtually all of my classmates were either the children of celebrities or, in some cases, celebrities themselves. At a bare minimum their parents were CEOs or diplomats or studio heads. All of that to say that I am not easily star struck. So, while meeting the Fonda’s was fantastic, it didn’t throw me for too much of a loop. That is, until they returned to the car after the event. As we went to pull out of the parking lot, I heard them talking about the dedication and all the people that were there. But then, casually, they happened to mention that the night’s MC have been none other than Robert Osborne!!! Or “Bobby” as my mother and I had come to call him. Having spent so much time with him on the TV screen over the years, we felt we knew him well enough to call him Bobby. It took all the tact I had not to slam on the breaks of the limousine, leave my clients waiting confused in the back of the car, and run back into the building to introduce myself. Between Robert Osborne and Roger Ebert, I’m not sure there are two men more responsible for shaping my taste in motion pictures. And the fact that I will have a chance to occupy the stage where he so often stood will be a great honor.
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
I am dedicating the film to my mother, Janice Malcolm. During those years of discovering classic film and delving into two, three, four, classic films a day, I was also living at home. Money was a bit slim trying to break in as a filmmaker and photographer and I had to move back in with my parents. I worked nights and my father worked during the day, meaning most days it was just me and my mother at home together. Whether through her own love of classic film, or, more likely, out of a sense of motherly love and obligation, she sat through the vast majority of those classic films right along with me. It got to be our afternoon ritual. And, to this day, there are very few moments in life that make me happier than watching a movie alongside my mother. Why “The Graduate?” Well, it’s simple. Without that movie, there’s a good chance that I wouldn’t exist. That is the film that my mother and father saw on their first date. Being someone who has literally broken up with someone due to conflicting tastes in movies, I fear that, had they not enjoyed the movie, things could have gone a completely different way.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
I had grown up hearing about the movie because of knowing the story of my parent’s first date. So, when I started working my way through the catalog of “great” films, it was one of the first films to check off my list. Other than my mother, I don’t think I have shared it with anyone else. I’ve watched it myself nearly a dozen times. But she’s the only one I’ve watched the film with side-by-side. It wasn’t hard to get her to sit down for that one.
What are some other films you and the person you dedicated this film to love?
I think probably the two films that I most enjoyed watching with my mother were Hal Ashby’s “The Landlord,” and Gregory La Cava’s “My Man Godfrey.” My mother loves comedies. And those two films, in particular, are so memorable because I don’t think I’ve ever seen my mother laugh so hard in my life. Probably because those films are not only funny, but also have two of the greatest mother characters in the history of film. Lee Grant’s mother in “The Landlord,” kind of a spiritual ancestor to Lucille Bluth, was a particular favorite to my mother. And a scene late in the film where she and Pearl Bailey decide to go a little too heavy on the moonshine just amused my mother to no end. Ditto to the scene in “My Man Godfrey” where the family matriarch, played by Alice Brady, is entertained by her protege/lover Carlo and exclaims “Carlo, do the gorilla, do the gorilla!” My mother might still be laughing years later over that scene.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
The Graduate is filled with iconic scenes, so it is hard to pick just one. The filmmaking on display here is second to none. Mike Nichols comedic pacing is simply a thing of beauty and it allows him both to evince the aimless haze of a life without direction while also delivering rapid fire dialogue as a breakneck pace. Probably my favorite individual scenes are, of course, the seduction where Benjamin Braddock can’t quite figure out if Mrs. Robinson is making a pass at him. And, if so, he’s not 100 sure how to respond. Anne Bancroft in that scene is playing him like a fiddle. Probably the only other scene in film history I can think of that so hilariously highlights woman’s power over man would be when Barbara Stanwyck flirts with Henry Fonda’s character in “The Lady Eve,” showing just the right amount of leg to a man who's spent the last several months “up the Amazon.” The other scene in “The Graduate” that never fails to deliver is the scene at the hotel where Dustin Hoffman attempts to obtain a hotel key for his first tryst with Mrs. Robinson. Mike Nichols directed Hoffman to play the scene, not as if he were in a hotel, but as if he were a tennager going into a store to ask for condoms. Now, even as a grown man, that can be awkward, and Hoffman plays just the perfect amount of embarrassment during the scene that will leave you laughing even if you don’t know the backstory. The film also hosts so many great visual frames, from the final image of the two leads in the back of the bus, to probably the greatest single cut in the history of film where Benjamin jumps out of the pool and ends up in bed. That’s not to mention the iconic image of Benjamin as seen through the bent and open leg of Mrs. Robinson which I recently just learned was the brainchild of storyboard artist/production designer Harold Michelson. If you haven’t seen the wonderful documentary “Harold and Lillian: A Hollywood Love Story,” you should definitely check it out.

ERNIE MANNIX

Movie Selection: NORTH BY NORTHWEST (1959)
Dedication To: His Mom
ERNIE MANNIX

Bio Questions

Where are you from?
Grew up on Long Island, Lived in Los Angeles for many years.
Where do you live now?
Northport, New York.
What do you do?
Currently working on my second novel, the sequel to: Six Devils In The San Fernando Valley I’m also a working Film Composer, Music Editor, Music Supervisor.
How did you discover classic films?
When I was a child I would watch “The Million Dollar Movie” and “Creature Features” on local NY TV. Sundays were all about and Costello and The Bowery Boys, on another local channel.
Did anyone get you into movies?
My mother was a big classic movie fan, and she’d let me stay up late on Friday nights to watch the classic Universal Horror films on the program called ‘Creature Features.’ We were big Laurel and Hardy fans also.
Do you remember the first movie you saw?
The first movie I remember going to was Mary Poppins. It was magical.
The first classic movie you saw?
Hard to remember that since they were always there, but possibly one of the Universal Horror films. Maybe ‘Son of Frankenstein’.
What’s a fun fact about you?
Was once cast as the voice of Peter Pan in a commercial for ‘Walt Disneys’ World on Ice’.
To whom are you dedicating your movie?
My late mother, Joan Mannix
Why?
My mother past away this past September at the age of 82. She was a force of nature, with the spirit, wit and fearless mind of a 25 year old. She was still working full-time (chasing after pre-school kids) when she fell ill. She was an avid reader (2 books a week,) and a very loyal TCM fan. She didn’t need a channel changer because the TV was always glued to TCM. She was a huge Cary Grant fan, and throughout my childhood my siblings and I would hear all about Cary Grant, his movies and how she felt about him. She’d spar with my dad about Cary Grant, saying, ‘oh he’s so handsome’ and my dad (a very handsome guy in his own right,) would spar back saying “that guy’s ugly and he can’t even act.” This went on anytime a Cary Grant movie was about to be on TV.
When did you discover this movie?
Probably in my teens.
Have you shared it with anyone else?
Yes, my children.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
So many favorite parts. Nobody was better at creating anxiety in a film than Hitchcock. From the second the mistaken-identity starts there’s a tremendous angst. This poor guy, Roger Thornhill, nobody believes him, the cops, his lawyer, not even his own mother. They kidnap him, force booze on him, then there’s the drunken driving at the edge of the cliff. After that he’s wrongly accused of murder. Angst… pure Hitchcock. Bernard Herrmann’s score is fantastic. It really propels the action. Take for instance the scene in the United Nation’s cafeteria. Roger Thornhill (Grant) gets (ridiculously) framed for stabbing the real Lester Townsend in the back. The music completely drives the scene, and continues over the next highly original shot from high-atop the United Nations building ( which is a model) looking down onto a small dot of a human running out of the building. (Grant). Without that music, the scene would have been quite different. It’s just a tiny dot moving along a sidewalk. With Herrmann’s score, we know that dot is Cary Grant and he’s very much in peril. It’s a ‘modern’ score, where music is used very much as an effect and where the themes aren’t really repetitive. They change as they go along. There’s three types of music in it: Chase, Romance, and Suspense. The romantic theme sounds like 19th century romanticism, then in sharp contrast, the chase and suspense music are filled with loud percussion and hence, modern sounding. My mother loved the fact that it started North By Northeast …her home, New York. The beginning is chock full of the hustle and bustle of Manhattan, The Plaza, 21, The Oak Bar are all mentioned. She loved the fact that the ‘Townsend mansion’ is actually the former Phipps estate which is now known as Old Westbury Gardens. We went there together a few years ago, and I showed her the location of the shot by the front steps of the beautiful home. It’s where a kidnapped Grant is being led out of the limousine. It’s all exactly the same, nothing’s changed. I love trains and one of the greatest trains of all time is featured: The New York Central 20th Century Limited. It was elegant travel, from the days when travel was fun and a big part of the vacation. It’s where we hear my favorite line of the film: “What do you do besides lure men to their doom on The 20th Century Limited?”

MATTHEW A. MYRICK

Movie Selection: Brief Encounter (1945)
Dedication To: His Mom
MATTHEW A. MYRICK

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I am from Washington, DC. I currently live in Philadelphia, PA.
What do you do?
I am a Professor in the Social Work Department of Widener University in Chester, PA. I am also in the dissertation phase of my PhD in social work at Widener University as well.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
I grew up in a household that appreciated classic films. My dad, mom, sister, grandmother, and I had classic films on the television on a regular basis. We did not have cable until I was in high school, so we watched broadcast stations which tended to repeat movies regularly. I remember Sunday mornings seeing serial series such as The Three Stooges, Blondie, and Tarzan films (We enjoyed them more with Curly and Johnny Weissmuller). I have memories seeing movies such as Rear Window, The Long, Long Trailer, Susan Slept Here, A Streetcar Named Desire, Whatever Happened To Baby Jane?, Meet Me in St. Louis, and The Man in Grey with various members of my family. Additionally, holiday classics which came on regularly were also part on my upbringing (Miracle on 34th Street, It’s A Wonderful Life, White Christmas, and A Christmas Carol [’38, ’51, ‘84]). As a family we also have our own holiday classics; A Tree Grows in Brooklyn for Christmas, My Man Godfrey (‘36) for New Year’s and Harvey for Easter. My mom told me that one of the first movies that scared me was The Bad Seed.
What’s a fun fact about you?
When I am not watching classic films, I read comic books and practice yoga.
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
I am dedicating this movie to my mom, Pauline Myrick, because whenever she or I see it on, we text one another or call one another to alert one another. Sometimes we place our phones on mute and watch from different cities. We are Anglophiles and enjoy watching movies and television about life in Great Britain. My mom enjoys Celia Johnson’s narration, Laura being relatable as a real person (it may help that she was not a glamourized star), the sacrifice the lovers make, and the music. She will usually say ‘I love this movie’ and so do I.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
At some point it came on TCM and I do not remember the chronology of who saw it first or who told the other about it. Somehow, we both watched it and agreed that we both thoroughly enjoyed it. We have got into a habit of alerting each other when it is about to come on or if we are watching it.
What are some other films you and the person you dedicated this film to love?
In addition to many of the films listed above, we both enjoy Pride and Prejudice (‘40), Great Expectations (‘46), A Catered Affair, and Mrs. Miniver.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
As an individual who regularly takes public transportation, I enjoy the scenes at the train station and the train sights and sounds paired with Rachmaninoff. The power of the movie is in the first scene and the last at the station. My mom always taught me that you never know what someone is going through even though you may ride the train every day with them. As viewers of the film we are the Dolly Messiter character who has no idea what is going on in the interior world or Laura or Alec. However, as the film continues, we get the pleasure and privilege of learning more about her complex inner thoughts.

JANINE PAVER

Movie Selection: WHAT’S UP DOC? (1972)
Dedication To: her daughter
JANINE PAVER

Bio Questions

Where are you from?
I was born in Hollywood and lived all over the LA area.
Where do you live now?
San Francisco
What do you do?
I am a fundraiser for a public media organization.
How did you discover classic films?
Like most kids, I started watching old movies on the floor in my grandparent's living room.
Did anyone get you into movies?
My parents were big into the 1950s/1960s romantic comedies so I probably started with all the Doris Day, Rock Hudson hits. I also loved all the classic comedy duos like Abbott and Costello and Martin and Lewis.
Do you remember the first movie you saw?
I’m sure it wasn’t the first, but it was close, I loved The Ghost and Mr. Chicken with Don Knotts, 1966.
The first classic movie you saw?
Sunset Boulevard
What’s a fun fact about you?
I wrote a fan letter to Siskel and Ebert pitching myself as a kid film reviewer—they never called. I also lived in Japan and my daughter was born there.
To whom are you dedicating your movie?
My daughter, Maggie
Why?
This movie has become our Mother’s Day tradition. One year when she was about 17, she shakily drove me through the streets of San Francisco pointing out all the locations where the film had been shot. It was such a great day. We also had pizza at the pizza place.
When did you discover this movie?
I’m sure it was an early one I watched on my parent’s tv, but I always loved the funny ladies—Lucille Ball, Doris Day, Myrna Loy so I would have been drawn to this one. I was so young when I saw this film for the first time, that I didn’t even know that Barbra Streisand was a singer—I just thought she was an actress. And Madeline Kahn is so terrific too.
Have you shared it with anyone else?
My daughter loves this movie and can recite much of the dialogue by memory.
Are you a particular fan of…
Funny ladies and femme fatales
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
There are so many great scenes! I love when Eunice ends up at the docks, love when Mrs. Van Hoskins is robbed, I love the court scene at the end. It is just a happy ride. And speaking of rides, the car chase is fantastic.

GARY PIERROT

Movie Selection: A Star is Born (1954)
Dedication To: His Parents
GARY PIERROT

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I was born in Fort Lauderdale, FL. I now live is Grand Prairie, TX.
What do you do?
I’m studying English in college, and making student films.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
I discovered classic films, because of the urge to learn more about the history of films. My parents got me into films when I was really young, and the first movie I remember seeing is the “The Others” with Nicole Kidman. The very first classic movie I was “The Wizard of Oz” when I was in grade school during the after school program.
What’s a fun fact about you?
I really love Harry Potter, and the Sorcerer's Stone
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
I’m dedicating my film to my family, because if it wasn’t for my family I wouldn’t have the confidence to try to go out, and tell stories.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
I discovered “A STAR IS BORN” a few years ago. I was blown away with it. I was already a Judy Garland fan from seeing her in other films. So I knew it would be interesting to watch. I’ve shared “A STAR IS BORN” with other friends of mine as well! Hopefully they’ve watched it.
Are you a particular fan of:
a. Judy Garland b. James Mason c. George Cukor d. Anyone else in the cast/crew e. Musicals I am a fan of Judy Garland, James Mason, George Cukor, and musicals. I’ve been a fan of Judy Garland since I saw her in “The Wizard Of Oz” when I was really young, and “A STAR IS BORN” was the first film I saw James Mason in, and then I saw him again in Stanley Kubrick’s, “LOLITA” which was really great. I also realized that George Cukor was involved with “A STAR IS BORN”, “WIZARD OF OZ”, and “GASLIGHT” which stars one of my favorite actresses INGRID BERGMAN. I really enjoy the types of films that he involves himself with.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
I love a lot of things about “A STAR IS BORN” but one of my favorite aspects of the film is the music by Harold Arlen & Ira Gershwin. There’s a scene in the beginning of the film where Judy Garland’s character (Esther Blodgett) decides to tell Danny that she’s going to quit the band, and right before the scene ends she opens the door, stares out at the sunset, and in that scene that’s just so much wonder radiating off of the screen. In that moment of the scene my heart fills up so much, because its a moment when Esther has so much hope, and inspiration. Those are the two things that you need to be able to go after your dreams.
Thoughts on the original? The other remakes?
I still haven’t seen the original, nor the Barbra Streisand remake. But, I have seen the latest remake with Lady Gaga, and Bradley Cooper which I think is outstanding. I think each version has its own little thing that makes it it’s own thing, and it’s cool to see how each generation interprets the story! Hopefully another one gets made when I’m 50 years old, and I can relive the story again!
Anything else you’d like to share?
Everyone should see “A STAR IS BORN”!

PATTI PIERUCCI

Movie Selection: THE YEARLING (1946)
Dedication To: Her Son
PATTI PIERUCCI

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
Originally from the Philadelphia/New Jersey area … I now live in southwest Virginia.
What do you do?
Full time Realtor and home stager.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
My mother inspired me to love classic films; she encouraged me and my siblings to watch them on TV every Saturday. She also played records from the movie musicals at home, so I grew up able to sing the songs from all the great movie musicals. I remember seeing the original King Kong on TV when I was young, in the early 1960s, and it terrified me; it is still a great movie that I believe holds up better than all the remakes. My next great movie memory was when my parents took me and my sister to see Gone With the Wind in a classic Philadelphia theater, during a 1970s revival. We were teenagers, and my father told us, “You’re going to love it; it’s a four-hour-long movie about the Civil War.” Yikes! It sounded horrible and we were dreading the experience, but it utterly captivated us from the very first scene.
What’s a fun fact about you?
I am a former newspaper writer/editor and have published two non-fiction books.
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
My son, Patrick Russell. He is an independent filmmaker in Atlanta, and was deeply affected by The Yearling when he saw it as a child. It was one of the films he saw at a young age that demonstrated how a great movie can impact your life. I believe it was one of the movies that, at this stage in his life, was a step in the ladder that led him to become a filmmaker. He wanted to be a part of an industry that had such great power to enrich lives.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
I don’t remember when I first saw it, but I introduced it to my son in the 1990s. However, I knew about the movie as a child because my mother named my sister Jody after the character in The Yearling – my family has a multi-generational love for this movie!
Are you a particular fan of:
a. Gregory Peck b. Jane Wyman c. Claude Jarman, Jr. d. Anyone else in the cast/crew I think everyone in this movie is wonderful, but Claude Jarman, Jr., is a stand-out as Jody. Every scene he is in, especially with the fawn, is powerful, moving, tender, or all of the above. He utterly steals the film! Jane Wyman is also wonderful as the perpetually irritable mother whose cold heart is finally thawed at the end. She is believable as a southern woman struggling with her emotions.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
The scenes between Jody and the deer are so sweet and beautifully filmed, they make it seem plausible that you can have a deer as a pet that lives in the house and even sleeps in your bed. Even I wanted a pet deer after seeing this movie! Another scene that was very sweet was when Jody talks to his fawn, Flag, and tells him that though he doesn’t ever plan to marry, because he doesn’t like girls, he knows that Flag will one day want a doe of his own. Jody promises to find him one, then all three of them – Jody, Flag and the doe – will live together when they’re grown up. The last scene in the film is bittersweet. Jody patches up the relationships with his parents … he successfully transitions from boy to young adult … he accepts all this new responsibility, yet when he goes to bed that night he dreams of his childhood with his little fawn. It’s both triumphant and heartbreaking at the same time.
Anything else you’d like to share?
My son saw this movie when he was about the same age as the character Jody in the film. He understood that “the yearling” refers not just to the deer, but to Jody, who was in between boyhood and young adulthood. He was so impacted by the film that he read the book by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings and developed an even deeper love for the story. Then I got him a red dachshund puppy which he named “Penny” after the father character in the story.

ANNELISA PURDIE

Movie Selection: JOHNNY BELINDA (1948)
Dedication To: Her Mother
ANNELISA PURDIE

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I’m from New York City, born and raised, and I still live there. My family has deep roots in the city.
What do you do?
I am a children’s librarian with the New York Public Library.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies?
My family have always been interested in classic movies, and they passed it down to all of the younger generations, so I came into it rightly, although some of us ran with it more than others did. I had an uncle who loved Bette Davis, an aunt who loved Westerns, and everyone thought (and still thinks,) Sidney Poitier was awesome. We grew up watching videocassettes of older films and catching them on different channels, and I started recognizing different actors, directors, film studios, and so on. And as I found favorite performers, I looked for books to find out more information about them and their work.
Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
There are two movies that stand out in my mind as the earliest films I remember seeing. The first is Robert Townsend’s The Meteor Man (1993,) which is an underrated classic, and that I loved from the first time I saw it. The second is Disney’s Oliver & Company (1988,) which jump-started my love of poodles. The first classic movie I remember seeing is The Ten Commandments (1956) when I was about four or five. I remember staying up through the whole thing without going to sleep, and floating my doll baby in the laundry basket down the “Nile,” which was in the living room.
What’s a fun fact about you?
I love vinyl records, and I have a collection of 45s and 33 LPs. There’s something about that medium that’s appealing, and it’s cool to me that they’re still in demand even in the digital age, or perhaps because of it. I even have a replica of the RCA phonograph, complete with the Nipper logo and that large, fluted horn.
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
I’m dedicating my movie to my wonderful mother. She’s been such an important part of my life, and the two of us have a deep bond. To me, she’s the personification of intelligence, softness and gentility being a sign of great strength. She’s also very attuned to others’ feelings and motivations for why they behave the way they do, what drives their actions, and so on, and she catches a lot of things that other people would miss. As a film, Johnny Belinda demonstrates many of the lessons that she’s taught me throughout the years. Some of them include that it’s okay to be different and not go along with the crowd, even when others may think that someone is odd, the importance of showing love to others and respecting the innate personhood of others, and trying to understand where someone else is coming from before writing them off altogether. I’m also dedicating this film to her because she’s pointed out how revolutionary it is in a number of ways, including the climax that leads to the courtroom scene, and Belinda’s love for her child, in spite of the harsh circumstances of the world he was brought into.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
I heard about Johnny Belinda for years. Another aunt of mine used to watch it when it came on television every year at Christmastime. And I often read references to it in essays about the presentation of disability in film, how the studios dealt with the issue of rape under the Production Code, and so on. I even got the original version of the play by Elmer Blaney Harris (which is excellent, and I recommend that everyone read it) to find out more about it. But I didn’t get to see the film until I was in my early teens and it aired on TCM. I talk about it with everyone, my friends, my colleagues at work, people in my professional circle. And whenever I meet someone who’s looking for a starter pack of classic films to pique their interest, this one is usually on the list.
What are some other films you and the person you dedicated this film to love?
Our tastes in films don’t always mesh (she loves musicals and dramas with happy endings while I lean towards dramas with complex villains,) but we do have some others that we love to watch together. They include Marty, The Gift Of Love (one of Lauren Bacall’s underappreciated performances,) Singin’ In The Rain, Seven Brides For Seven Brothers, The Man In The Gray Flannel Suit, the 1951 version of Quo Vadis (which is my favorite film of all time,) The Last Gangster, Interrupted Melody, Claudine, The Last Angry Man, Baby Face, Bachelor Mother, and Lizzie, (which I vastly prefer to The Three Faces Of Eve.) I also love The World, The Flesh and The Devil; I think it’s Harry Belafonte’s best film performance, but the studio-enforced ending is so compromised.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
Even though Dr. Richardson (Lew Ayres) and Locky (Stephen McNally) are intertwined though their involvement (on opposite ends of the spectrum) with Belinda (Jane Wyman,) it’s notable that the two of them never actually speak to each other in the film. Save for a very brief moment at the beginning where Locky hands the doctor his coat, they’re not even in the same scenes together. Locky even goes into Dr. Richardson’s house at one point and makes himself comfortable, but the doctor’s not there; later in the film he spearheads this horrible rumor about the doctor throughout the town. And Dr. Richardson obviously does not care for Locky either, and rightfully thinks he’s a brute. Yet the two of them never exchange words. This is something that was carried over from the stage play. And it’s always been fascinating to me how the two have such an indirect impact on each other, but they never get into a confrontation. It would have been interesting to see, but it would have been a different film.

MOE RESNER

Movie Selection: KITTY FOYLE
Dedication To: His Mom
MOE RESNER

Bio Questions

Where are you from?
The Bronx.
Where do you live now?
New Jersey
What do you do?
I was brought up in the finance industry as a credit executive, then drifted on my own as a commercial finance consultant, acquiring loans for my clients. I was also considered a natural stand-up comedian and still entertain, particularly in the world of professional major league baseball. Through a great deal of my life, I also played semi-pro baseball and subsequently hired as a minor league coach for the Montreal Expos. I was honored by the SF Giants in 2012 and threw out the first ball in a Chicago Cubs uniform at Wrigley Field just a year ago. I've been a Cubs fan for 73 years ago and never lived in Chicago. Some life, right?
How did you discover classic films?
My interest in the Classics began long before Turner Classic Movies was created. I've been watching it religiously for many years. Aside from Ginger in the Major and the Minor, whom I adored, I became attached to Humphrey Bogart starring in The Maltese Falcon. In fact, I used to perform in the public-school auditorium, and did impressions, including Bogart, Sydney Greenstreet, and Peter Lorre. Greenstreet was the easiest. He was a great character actor.
Do you remember the first movie you saw?
The Wizard of Oz
The first classic movie you saw?
The Wizard of Oz
What’s a fun fact about you?
Was once cast as the voice of Peter Pan in a commercial for ‘Walt Disneys’ World on Ice’.
To whom are you dedicating your movie?
I have decided to dedicate my Ginger Rogers story to TCM as well as to a museum that might still be in existence. My library is immense, with over 40 letters sent to me from Ginger, including all kinds of photographs and playbills. Some of the photos include shots of me and Ginger taken at Katherine Cornell's mountain resort, while she starred in Broadway's "Hello Dolly". From the age of 11, and into 30 years together, I was a lucky man with her.

MICHELLE RHODES

Movie Selection: RANDOM HARVEST (1942)
Dedication To: Her Husband
MICHELLE RHODES

Bio Questions

Where are you from?
Fort Walton Beach, Florida
Where do you live now?
Salisbury, North Carolina - near Charlotte.
What do you do?
Mostly retired. I do freelance voice work for television and radio. My full-time career was 20+ years in radio, first as a discjockey and later as copywriter and Creative Director. I had a second career as a Technical Writer maintaining aircraft maintenance manuals at Cherry Point Naval Base.
How did you discover classic films?
I loved watching them as a kid. I’ve enjoyed them ever since. I’m a movie buff in general but many classic films are of a calibre that is hard to find anymore.
Did anyone get you into movies?
I guess my parents. I just saw them on TV, but I will say that after Ben and I got married I was able to watch them much more often because he loves classic films as much as I do. No fighting over the TV!
Do you remember the first movie you saw?
Not really. Maybe Snow White or another Disney film.
The first classic movie you saw?
I don’t know that this was the first classic film I saw but it made a huge impression on me. My parents took us to see The Ten Commandments at the movie theatre and I was enthralled. Other times that stand out to me: my parents took me to a drive-in to see The Pink Panther. And another time we saw a double feature at the drive-in of Soylent Green and West World. I loved them!
What's a fun fact about you?
I’ve sung onstage with Bob Hope, Tony Bennett and Barry Manilow! It’s not nearly as impressive as it sounds but they are fun memories.
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
My husband, Ben Rhodes. We met in Florida when I was 13 and he was 14. We fell in love immediately and I knew he was “the one.” Two years later his family moved across the country to Idaho and we were crushed. No internet or cell phones then and long distance was really expensive so we only got to talk on the phone once. We had to communicate through letters. After he graduated from high school he joined the Air Force. He came to visit and I was a senior in high school. He asked if I would marry him after I graduated. Of course I said yes but through a series of unfortunate events it didn’t happen and we actually lost touch, having no idea where the other was. We each raised families and about 30 years later when both of our marriages were over, we finally reconnected through the internet. It was as if we had never parted. I lived on the coast of North Carolina at that time and he lived in North Dakota. We had the classic film reunion at the airport with us running towards each other and everyone staring. It was obvious this wasn’t a normal reunion. That was 10 years ago and marrying each other was the best thing we’ve ever done.
When did you discover this movie?
Ben actually introduced it to me. He already had it on DVD and for obvious reasons, it resonated with both of us.
Have you shared it with anyone else?
I’ve told people about it but haven’t seen it with anyone but Ben. We’ve watched it several times over the years.
Are you a particular fan of:
a. Ronald Colman - I think Ronald Colman is wonderful. He comes across as such a warm person. My husband says he has one of the kindest and sadest faces he’s ever seen. b. Greer Garson - I also love Greer Garson. But I’d have to say my favorite actress is Bette Davis. c. Mervyn LeRoy - I didn’t know he was the director but he did a great job with this film. d. Anyone else in the cast/crew - Una O’Connor. She had a very small part as the lady that worked in the tobacco shop but she’s great in everything. Loved her in Christmas in Connecticut. e. Romantic Dramas - I’ve never really thought about that. My taste in movies is so diverse but when I think about it, there are many romantic dramas I love, such as Enchanted Cottage; Now, Voyager; Casablanca; Mildred Pierce; and Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
This is a spoiler that we’d have to talk about in the outro, but yes! I love Ronald Colman’s face when she calls him by the name “Smithy” and he turns and looks at her, finally remembering their past. His face completely changes – carefree and innocent, like he was when they first met. I am amazed he could convey that with just the slightest change in his face. It’s an incredible moment that always brings tears to my eyes.

BRENDA ROGERS

Movie Selection: WUTHERING HEIGHTS (1939)
Dedication To: her future man
BRENDA ROGERS

Bio Questions

Where are you from?
Fort Worth, Texas
Where do you live now?
Dallas, Texas
What do you do?
Vice President of Administration, Executive Assistant to the CEO at Del Frisco’s Restaurant Group
How did you discover classic films?
Did anyone get you into movies?
It was my daddy. He always took us to the movies at the local theater.
Do you remember the first movie you saw?
The first movie I remember going to a theater to see was “Superfly”. Not sure it was appropriate for children, but we went with our daddy.
The first classic movie you saw?
Wow, I don’t recall the first classic movie I saw.
What’s a fun fact about you?
I danced with a stranger at the Palais de Chaillot in Paris. He walked up to me and said, “Danse?” and he took me in his arms and we danced—to no music. I’m sure if that is a fun fact but it is a great memory for me.
To whom are you dedicating your movie?
I am dedicating “Wuthering Heights” to my future boyfriend out there somewhere.
Why?
Because the love that Cathy and Heathcliff had was amazing! Even though they never really got together, they never stopped loving each other. Cathy truly loved Heathcliff until her dying day.
When did you discover this movie?
I discovered it about 15 years ago.
Have you shared it with anyone else?
I always talk about “Wuthering Heights” to my friends and few of them have seen it. About nine years ago, TCM aired the movie on Valentine’s Day (or maybe it was Valentine’s Day weekend). I wanted my boyfriend at the time to see it. So, I planned a romantic evening around this movie: great meal, wine, etc. He watched it with me and was not as enthralled as I was. I was so disappointed—in him.
Are you a particular fan of…
I am a huge fan of Carey Grant. I have a picture of him in my office.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
The scene that I love is at the end. Cathy is dying. Heathcliff rushes to her and kneels at her bedside. Later in scene, he picks her up from the bed and takes her to the window to look at the moors one last time (I have a poster of this scene in my home). Cathy dies in his arms. When the doctor tries to take her, Heathcliff says, “She’s mine!” as if he was a dog and she was his bone. He takes her back to the bed and says, “I can’t live without my life and I cannot die without my soul.” As many times as I’ve heard that line, it gets me every time.

LYNDSAY ROUZER

Movie Selection: CALAMITY JANE (1953)
Dedication To: her grandma
LYNDSAY ROUZER

Bio Questions

Where are you from?
I am from Lancaster, California
Where do you live now?
Lancaster, California
What do you do?
I teach in a large urban high school (English lit and student government).
How did you discover classic films?
I discovered classic films when bored on a week's vacation at my grandma's house. The first classic film she gave me to watch was Calamity Jane, the film I'm dedicating to her.
Did anyone get you into movies?
My grandmother
The first classic movie you saw?
Calamity Jane
What’s a fun fact about you?
I take student travel groups all over the world every summer for the past 12 years.
To whom are you dedicating your movie?
My grandma.
Why?
She introduced me to the world of classic film on a bored summer afternoon and I didn't realize at the time what a big gift it would be. I thought she was just fobbing me off with some old person stuff. I kept that opinion on the first day I watched the film. On the second day, I asked to watch it again. It was all downhill from there.
When did you discover this movie?
I was about eleven when my grandma sent me upstairs to watch Calamity Jane.
Have you shared it with anyone else?
I've shared it with friends who also have classic film leanings.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
My favorite scene is when Doris Day is entering the big dance at the fort in her first 'girl' outfit. I love that she's all covered up in that big army coat and Howard Keel is complaning about her appearance. When she takes the coat off in the lobby Howard Keel doesn't recognize her. When he finally does, I love the physical comedy of his jaw dropping and Doris Day having to come over and offer him her arm, instead of the other way around. He takes her arm, still open-mouthed, and they walk out of the shot while the extras laugh. Mostly I love the explosion of sound and color that this movie represents, a complete escape into a world that never existed. And I don't care that it didn't. As long as it was real for me, I'm good.
Additional:
When I was a kid you used to go spend a week in the summer at my grandma's house in Glendale. Naturally, after the course of the week you'd start to get a little bored. One afternoon my grandma must have noticed I was looking a little bored because she said, "I think I have something you're going to like," and she handed me this blue VHS tape with this crazy woman dressed in buckskins on the cover, and sent me upstairs. So I took the tape with a healthy dose of eleven year old skepticism and climbed the stairs in her creaky old house in Glendale, laid on her big old fashioned canapoy bed and put the film in. I didn't know what I was looking at from the first moment of stagecoach, old Western dialogue, and wild singing. I promptly took it back downstairs and told her I didn't like it. It was weird. But I asked to watch it the next day. From that time on classic film really became this Pandora's box of color and escapism that I still love.

LORI SHUTRUMP

Movie Selection: BULLITT (1968)
Dedication To: Her Dad
LORI SHUTRUMP

Bio Questions

Where are you from?
Youngstown Ohio
Where do you live now?
Cincinnati OH
What do you do?
I have been in the health care industry my whole career. I graduated from Youngstown State University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Health and Physical Education specializing in Fitness Management. I’ve been a Corporate Wellness Specialist, Program Director, Community Health Educator, Marketing and Admissions Director for a retirement village, and I’m currently a Key Accounts Manager in the pharmaceutical industry.
How did you discover classic films?
I discovered classic films at a very young age. I just knew movies gave me something nothing else did. I would watch movies on the weekends long before cable and TCM existed. I enjoyed black and white films and the evolution of Technicolor. Equal to my interest in the story was, and still is, my fascination with the fashion, furniture, hairstyles, and music unique to each time period of the movie (you can’t beat a film with a dance scene from the 60s). But for my dad it was all about the cars, when I lived at home and watched movies, my dad would walk through the family room, stop and look at the TV, and then tell me the make, model, and year of every car in the film. Old movies just make me happy. I still look forward to the opportunity on the weekends to watch them, and occasionally during the week. I have TCM on whenever I’m getting ready for work in the morning, or when I’m cooking, cleaning, decorating, hanging out, relaxing, need an escape, get to control the remote…really almost all the time.
Did anyone get you into movies?
Dad.
Do you remember the first movie you saw?
No
The first classic movie you saw?
No
What’s a fun fact about you?
I won Mother of the Year once.
To whom are you dedicating your movie?
My father, Ed McMurray
Why?
I had one of the most serendipitous connections with my father the first time I watched this classic mob thriller with the iconic car chase. My dad loved cars and motorcycles, his happy place was being in his garage repairing, restoring, and rebuilding broken cars and motorcycles. It was his hobby and he embraced the challenge of fixing them and giving them new life. The more they were broken or in pieces the better the challenge and bigger the reward for him. Unfortunately, my father passed away on June 30th of this year, I was devastated. He was in pain for several months and I was by his side helping my mom and sister as much as I could during the final weeks of his life. It was awful. I returned home after the weekend of his funeral and needed to escape from the heavy sorrow, the impending death that hovered over us for weeks, and being in shock of losing my father. I needed to go to my happy place of watching TCM. I didn’t check the schedule to see what movie was on because it didn’t matter, I just needed an old move, a classic movie, any movie to give me some relief. Some people turn to alcohol to cope, others do drugs to feel better… I do TCM. I was alone in my bedroom when I turned on the TV and the movie Bullitt had already started. I never saw it before, nor was I a Steve McQueen fan, my feelings were neutral toward him. I didn’t like or dislike him, I just didn’t know much about him other than his movies were very “macho man” movies and he had a bad boy reputation in real life. But when I saw the classic cars lining the streets of San Francisco, including the VW beetles (I have a yellow VW beetle) I was immediately drawn into the movie. Then I saw the women’s clothes and hairstyles and the camera angle through their legs, the 60s music, and a very cool and handsome Steve McQueen… I was hooked and, in that moment, I felt a little relief from the deep sorrow of losing my father. Honestly, I was a little confused trying to figure out the story line and who were the good guys and who were the bad guys. But the more I watched the movie the more I liked Lieutenant Frank Bullitt. He was a good guy, respected by his boss and colleagues, hardworking, honest, pushing the envelope (hiding a dead body, losing the medical records) but all for the greater good. While watching the movie, I started to research Steve McQueen on my phone, I don’t know why but I just had the urge to look him up. And the first fact that came up was that he died from complications of surgery attempting to treat his Mesothelioma… WAIT … WHAT!?... My father had just passed away from complications from a surgery to help alleviate the pain caused by his Mesothelioma. It took my breath away. I read a little bit more about Steve McQueen and saw more personal similarities between he and my dad, and in that moment I felt my father’s presence and all of my attention focused on the TV …the classic cars, the good guy, the likeness of my father’s character to Lt. Bullitt in this movie and to Steve McQueen in real life… they both loved cars and motorcycles, and they both died from the same cancer caused by being around something they loved. I was having an experience that I never had before and I still get overwhelmed with gratitude thinking about it. I knew in the midst of this surreal experience that my dad was and always will be with me. He couldn’t have been more present with me as I watched and cried through the rest of the movie. I didn’t escape the sorrow, instead I was comforted by this fifty-year-old mob murder, twisted storyline, car chasing movie with the respectable, smart, protective, and coolest leading man ever…those blue eyes looked through the screen and completely mesmerized me. Needless to say, I’m a Steve McQueen fan now.
When did you discover this movie?
Recently, after father’s death.
Have you shared it with anyone else?
My daughter. To add another layer, my daughter and I had just been to San Francisco for the first time a few weeks prior to this and I was captivated by the scenes that included places where we had been. We rented a convertible Camaro and drove the same streets of that legendary car chase. However, I barely drove five miles per hour because it felt as if we were driving over the edge of the earth. I can’t comprehend driving more than one hundred miles an hour through those severe steep hilly streets like they did when filming the movie. My dad’s legacy lives on in me through my love of cars, my children’s love of cars and motorcycles. The day my father rode side by side with his grandson on their motorcycles was one of the happiest days of my dad’s life. My son rode my father’s motorcycle in the funeral procession from the church to the cemetery, and the first day I rode on my father’s motorcycle was when I rode on the back with my son driving us from the cemetery back to my childhood home where my parents have lived for fifty years. I researched the film as well and learned that the car chase set the standard for future car chases, it won several awards mostly for the behind the scenes heroes of editing and sound. Another layer to my story is that they used a VW beetle in the editing to ensure the scene sequences were consistent. The film lover in me especially enjoyed the way the camera made me feel like I was a part of so many of the scenes… like being in the crowd, or seeing Steve McQueen from across the room, or being in the car with him, or in the car next to him, or having dinner with him. I wanted to reach through the TV screen and touch him, hold onto him, hug him.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
I can’t really pick just one scene from the movie, it was a compilation of Lt. Frank Bullitt reminding me of my father with his integrity, work ethic, persistence, and respectable character…the classic cars…San Francisco…Steve McQueen’s personal parallels to my father…the timing of that specific movie being on exactly when I needed it and then getting to know an actor who shared my dad’s love of driving cars and riding motorcycles…it was almost two full hours of being in my dad’s presence and being comforted in the knowledge that he will always be with me. There was one question that my dad always asked people about their cars, “Did you peel the tires yet?” Of course in my video for this contest I wanted to peel the tires on my yellow VW beetle exactly like Bullitt’s Ford Mustang did when he was chasing the Dodge Charger. My dad would have been so proud of me. But I was told that cars with front wheel drive can’t do that. I opted to make the video in my father’s garage next to his motorcycle, tools, mechanical instruments, the creeper, grease, oil, and surrounded by his spirit, heart and soul.

KAREN SNOW

Movie Selection: THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD (1938)
Dedication To: her mom
KAREN SNOW

Bio Questions

Where are you from?
New York City
Where do you live now?
New York City
What do you do?
I’m a Research Specialist, doing rights & clearances of IP for clients wanting to use various media in projects, commercial and non-commercial. Anything that has rights – books, titles, signatures, TV, movies, videos, music, logos, brands, buildings, trademarks, people – anything ! I’ll track down ownership, or estates, -- wherever the trail leads – then negotiate usage on behalf of clients. When I first started this work 30 years ago, it took very little time for my bosses to realize I had a special area of expertise, so any request that came in which remotely touched on older movies was zapped right to me. In the days before you could look up stuff on the Internet, it was common practice for a colleague to yell a question to me across the room – like what studio made On the Waterfront – and I’d yell “Columbia” back at them. I can remember so clearly the first deceased person whose estate I had to find – the character actor Charles King). Took me two weeks of networking by phone and fax (remember this was 1988) but I had a total blast talking to film experts happy to share their knowledge. I got to talk to screenwriter Barry Shipman – who couldn’t help by the way -- but I didn’t care, he was such fun on the phone. And yes, I eventually found Charles King Jr. – turns out he was a member of the LA IATSE Union. And luckily he gave permission to use the clip of his Father, taken from an old serial, for our client (who was AT&T). It was then I realized my job had a lot in common with being a detective. Not that I ran out and purchased a trench coat, but that’s how I started describing my job. I also do searches for stock footage and stock photos. And my current bosses still look to me if a search involves classic films.
How did you discover classic films?
After falling in love with The Adventures of Robin Hood, my interest networked as I investigated all the actors and crew on that movie, which led to their other work, and every movie I came across caused that same ripple effect pattern. Before film, my ruling passion was reading, anything I could get my hands on. Truly a bookworm. So the first Saturday after seeing Robin Hood, I took myself down the Brentano’s, a big bookstore in midtown NYC. There I found my first film book, The Films of Errol Flynn by Tony Thomas, Rudy Behlmer and Clifford McCarty. After I grabbed it, I noticed that the film section had quite a lot of books in it. That was my first exposure to the various areas of film, and over the years I’ve done my utmost to acquire LOTS AND LOTS of other books. Just about all the wall space in our apt is bookshelves.
Did anyone get you into movies?
Seems like I always loved the movies and my family let me run with it. My parents, who came from show biz themselves, were great about encouraging my interest – it was my Dad who introduced me to the Marx Brothers and Flash Gordon serials. My Mother was my biggest cheerleader. My older sister once treated me to a revival screening of “Animal Crackers”. My younger brother surprised me one birthday with the big coffee table book David O. Selznick’s Hollywood – I still treasure it. However I do remember one time when I was 15 and watching The Big Sleep in their room and hearing my Dad say to my Mom “Where does she get it from?” Regarding my parents, my Mother was a dancer, my Dad an Arranger/orchestrator/composer. They met at the famous Tamiment and got married during the Christmas break of the Broadway show “Wonderful Town”, which she was in and for which he played rehearsal piano. Dad eventually ended up writing jingles, and I got to sing on a number of them. They still kept up friendships with many artists over the years, and I never tired of hearing stories of those times. I was blessed to be in NYC during the golden age of revival theaters, and I’m sure I went to them all. I practically lived at The Regency Theater, which was 13 blocks from where we lived and ran the most marvelous series. The programmer/Manager Frank Rowley, was so nice, and once in a while would use one of my suggestions, which was a thrill. Then I found the Friday night New School Series, run by film historian extraordinaire William K. Everson. It was listening to him and reading his screening notes that inspired me to go to grad school, at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, where I acquired an MA in Cinema Studies. And became probably the only student at the film school who didn’t want to make a movie. All I wanted was the history. I tried to take every class Everson taught, and although he didn’t share my enthusiasm for my 2nd-place love after Errol, which was Lon Chaney Sr., he graciously gave me access to 16mm prints in his collection so I could complete my Masters on Chaney. One of the kindest gentlemen I’ve ever had the privilege to know. He also introduced me to the Cinefest event, which brought me so much pleasure and so many friends.
Do you remember the first movie you saw?
If you mean outside of on TV I can’t say for sure but it might have been a 16mm rental of “Sleeping Beauty” run at a friend’s home when I was 5 – it scared me silly. I do remember seeing Mary Poppins in the original theatrical run when I was 6.
The first classic movie you saw?
Probably The Wizard of Oz on TV (even though we saw the whole thing in B&W because we didn’t get a color TV until I was about 9). (Not that you asked, but the first Broadway show I can remember was “Here’s Love”(1963), the musical version of “Miracle on 34th Streeet”.)
What’s a fun fact about you?
I can recite every best picture winner in chronological order. I accidentally discovered I could do this when I was about 20: my sister was telling about my movie trivia gifts to a friend, who then asked me to prove it by naming every best picture winner whose title was one word (“the” didn’t count). I started with Wings then started spitting out the names as I mentally scrolled through the years. It became my best parlor trick. Only I didn’t keep it up after 2000. Another fun fact: About the same time as classic films took over my life, I also discovered the joys of reading obituaries. It wasn’t morbid interest, but finding out what a great pleasure getting these little slices of history to read gave me. I used to start the day greeting my parents by asking “who died ?” and grabbing the paper once they had finished with it. This little quirk did give my Mother some pause (“my daughter likes to read the obits – it’s so strange…”)
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
My Mother. She was the one who allowed me to stay up and watch it on The Late Movie. And she had her own Errol Flynn story. While working as a dancer in the 1950’s, she appeared on a TV show that featured Flynn, and he asked her out on a date (see attached photos for what she looked like at that time). I went wild when she told me this and demanded all the details. But that’s when she popped my balloon and told me she turned him down. When asked why, she said it was because she was already married by that time. And this explanation made absolutely no sense to me at the wise age of 13. Why should being married stop her from going out with Errol Flynn? After she discovered my growing obsession with classic film, she always encouraged it, and after a few years started to call me her walking encyclopedia of trivia (which I loved). In turn I enjoyed hearing her comments about movies and actors and what she had thought when she first saw them. As a child growing up in Far Rockaway she’d been a regular at her local theater’s Saturday matinees. She never minded when I would go off on a talking jag over something I’d just discovered – like finding out Laurence Olivier could sing (The Beggar’s Opera) – and we loved going to movies and shows together.
When did you discover this movie?
I was 13 when I first saw the movie on TV. It was like the proverbial ton of bricks falling on my head. Or having a vision on the road to Damascus. Take your pick – all I know is that it irrevocably changed my life forever. At 13, perhaps being on the cusp of puberty made me ripe for a sudden fascination, but it was one I never grew out of. I thought Errol Flynn was the handsomest guy I’d ever seen, I was enchanted by the costumes and music, and the story seemed so perfectly presented. I have never, over the many years since, gotten tired of it.
Have you shared it with anyone else?
Oh – maybe everyone I ever met in my life who asked me what my favorite movie was.
Are you a particular fan of:
a. Errol Flynn YES b. Olivia de Havilland YES c. Michael Curtiz YES d. Basil Rathbone, Claude Rains, anyone else in the cast/crew YES, especially composer Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Because I loved the score to this movie so much, that led to appreciating other film composers and I became a huge fan of move scores. The series of LPs put out in the 1970s by Charles Gerhardt on Korngold, Steiner, Newman, etc. almost got worn out from my re-playing them, and the I remember the wonderful liner notes whetting my appetite to find any movie title I hadn’t yet seen. e. Adventure films YES.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
The love scene in Maid Marian’s room is a favorite. And the archery contest – that scene inspired me to improve my archery when I went to summer camp. And it paid off – I won that event in color war !
Anything else you’d like to share?
I always wanted every single outfit worn by Olivia de Havilland in the movie, especially the one in the archery contest – that beautiful white dress with the royal blue wimple. I’D PAY MONEY TO WEAR THAT ONE.

TERRY SULLIVAN

Movie Selection: THE QUIET MAN (1952)
Dedication To: his wife
TERRY SULLIVAN

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
Born in Chicago. Longtime resident of Glen Ellyn (suburb of).
What do you do?
Alliance Manager for a software company
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
Late night reruns and TCM. My father-in-law used to enjoy talking old movies with me and often suggested a title. I always liked the feel of B&W movies. Ran was probably the first foreign language film I tried.
What’s a fun fact about you?
My parents met at a Notre Dame football game (yes more Irish stuff) A couple years ago I latched onto a list called “The 1011 Movies You Should Watch Before You Die” Just finished #627 (Solaris (1972)).
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
To my wife Linda and our family. You know the story
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
Back in the ‘80’s. Have turned a number of people onto it.
What are some other films you and the person you dedicated this film to love?
The Shop Around the Corner, Random Harvest, Rear Window, Arsenic and Old Lace, The Verdict
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
Lots to choose from here but overlooked might be the scenes involving the train crew and the station master. Whether frustrating Duke in his attempt to get directions or arguing over the history of Irish Hurling while the train is over four hours late. Really adds texture to the movie.

ROWAN TUCKER-MEYER

Movie Selection: RAFFLES (1939)
Dedication To: his grandparents
ROWAN TUCKER-MEYER

Bio Questions

Where are you from? Where do you live now?
I live in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where I was born.
How old are you? What grade are you in high school? What’s your dream job?
I am fifteen years old and a sophomore in high school. I can’t say that there’s one specific career that I would consider my dream job, but there are many different things that I would be interested in pursuing, like playing jazz piano or writing film criticism. However, I’d only want to write film criticism for older films, and unfortunately, I don’t think there’s too much demand for that right now.
How did you discover classic films? Did anyone get you into movies? Do you remember the first movie you saw? The first classic movie you saw?
My discovery of classic films began when I was about 7 years old, and I became interested in seeing the first film ever made. This search led me to the world’s first film director, Louis Le Prince, who made such classics as Man Walking Around A Corner and Accordion Player. This then led me to the works of the Lumière Brothers, Méliès, and eventually silent comedians like Chaplin and Lloyd. From then on, I was hooked on classic cinema.
What’s a fun fact about you?
While watching Fritz Lang’s M, I was suddenly inspired to learn to speak German. I have now been learning German for over three years and I have not yet finished watching M.
To whom are you dedicating your movie? Why?
I am dedicating this film to my Grandpa and Grandma, John and Nancy Meyer (my mom’s parents). They are huge fans of TCM, and I first decided to watch TCM after reading one of their copies of the Now Playing newsletter. I want to dedicate Raffles to them to express my gratitude, because, by introducing me to TCM, they have helped me to become an even more passionate cinephile.
When did you discover this movie? Have you shared it with anyone else?
I first learned about Raffles in one of the Now Playing newsletters at my grandparents’ house. I was so intrigued by the description that I wrote down when it was playing on TCM. This was probably in the summer of 2015. Shortly after that, I was given a subscription to Now Playing and to this day I will still go through the schedule every month and write down all of the intriguing films that I would like to see. I have not shared Raffles with anyone else.
What are some other films you and the person(s) you dedicated this film to love?
Some films that my grandparents love (and I do too) include Singin’ in the Rain, It’s A Wonderful Life, Casablanca, and The Producers.
Do you have a favorite scene in this movie, or should we pay attention to anything specific?
There’s a lot of really delightful stuff going on in this movie. I love watching the interactions between Raffles and Inspector Mackenzie. Mackenzie knows that Raffles is the Amateur Cracksman and Raffles knows that Mackenzie knows, but they both are too careful to mention it. Something that’s pretty surprising is the way that this film uses silence. There’s a very suspenseful scene where about eight minutes go by without almost any dialogue, which is quite unusual for a Hollywood film from the 30s. My favorite scene is probably when Mackenzie comes to Raffles’ apartment and Raffles hopes that Mackenzie will not find the hidden necklace. It’s an almost Hitchcock-esque scene and it never fails to amuse me.